About Me

Rushfield Babylon

where it all went wrong
Writer, reporter, Idol chronicler, seer. Contact: rr at richardrushfield dot com

Recent comments

  • March 3, 2014 5:00 pm
    Check out my Red Carpet Collection on Yahoo: Richard Wins The Red Carpet!.
You’ve heard all the nabobs weigh in on their red carpet thoughts, but now that the dust has settled, I am here to tell you who knows how to dress like a human being for the most fancy event in the history of the world. We’ve got this new app here at Yahoo that lets you make your choices and put together your own collection. Go ahead and try it! Even though you’ll find, that my top six are in fact the definitive winners.
Chain mail! Pregnant ladies! Fat guys! Liza! This red carpet had it all. View high resolution

    Check out my Red Carpet Collection on Yahoo: Richard Wins The Red Carpet!.

    You’ve heard all the nabobs weigh in on their red carpet thoughts, but now that the dust has settled, I am here to tell you who knows how to dress like a human being for the most fancy event in the history of the world. We’ve got this new app here at Yahoo that lets you make your choices and put together your own collection. Go ahead and try it! Even though you’ll find, that my top six are in fact the definitive winners.

    Chain mail! Pregnant ladies! Fat guys! Liza! This red carpet had it all.

  • February 27, 2014 7:10 pm

    "But the need for hatchetry has never been greater: Sometimes journalists need big guns to bag their quarry: They must turn prosecutorial and busy themselves with accuracy instead of “fairness.” This is especially true when covering people who lord immense governmental or corporate power over the rest of us. When writing about such potentates as Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman, journalists should always proceed under the presumption that the subject is up to no good. (Journalists, who wield inordinate power, should be fair game for the hatcheteers, too.)"

    Jack Schafer

    And that goes for you too young Hollywood “journalists”

  • February 26, 2014 4:34 pm
    You guys, I talked to Gene Hackman.  Legend and now mystery novelist.  My two favorite things for someone to be.  He’s disappeared from our lives for 11 years now since his last film role.
We spoke of his novel, the mystery genre, and I asked the big question: when might we see him on the screen again.  
Find out the answer over at Yahoo. View high resolution

    You guys, I talked to Gene Hackman.  Legend and now mystery novelist.  My two favorite things for someone to be.  He’s disappeared from our lives for 11 years now since his last film role.

    We spoke of his novel, the mystery genre, and I asked the big question: when might we see him on the screen again.  

    Find out the answer over at Yahoo.

  • February 26, 2014 2:44 pm
    My life today in Netflix profile form. View high resolution

    My life today in Netflix profile form.

  • February 26, 2014 12:38 pm
    We were soldiers once and young.
Oscar memories.
(via) View high resolution

    We were soldiers once and young.

    Oscar memories.

    (via)

  • February 25, 2014 12:57 pm
    Two quotes about Harold Ramis
Like all right thinking people I am devastated about the loss of Harold Ramis. From SCTV on, there is no one in comedy with a resume like his. Two quotes I’ve found say it all better than I could.
From Ken Levine:

I always loved Harold Ramis comedies. He had this amazing ability to mix broad outlandish comedy with real emotional moments. No matter how absurd and extreme his scenarios could be, there was always an underlying layer of humanity. The goal was to make you laugh, not shock you. He was never mean-spirited. His comedies were always smart, even when they were silly. And you got the sense he had great affection for his characters – all of his characters – even the gopher. 


On why he passed on joining SNL from a 2009 GQ interview: 

Lorne [Michaels] offered me a job, but at that point I was the head writer on SCTV.SNL was completely fueled by cocaine; the show was being written literally overnight. I didn’t want to stay up all night writing. And the show had a veneer of New York sophistication—very snide and superior. I thought, It’s just not me.

RIP View high resolution

    Two quotes about Harold Ramis

    Like all right thinking people I am devastated about the loss of Harold Ramis. From SCTV on, there is no one in comedy with a resume like his. Two quotes I’ve found say it all better than I could.

    From Ken Levine:

    I always loved Harold Ramis comedies. He had this amazing ability to mix broad outlandish comedy with real emotional moments. No matter how absurd and extreme his scenarios could be, there was always an underlying layer of humanity. The goal was to make you laugh, not shock you. He was never mean-spirited. 

    His comedies were always smart, even when they were silly. And you got the sense he had great affection for his characters – all of his characters – even the gopher. 

    On why he passed on joining SNL from a 2009 GQ interview: 

    Lorne [Michaels] offered me a job, but at that point I was the head writer on SCTV.SNL was completely fueled by cocaine; the show was being written literally overnight. I didn’t want to stay up all night writing. And the show had a veneer of New York sophistication—very snide and superior. I thought, It’s just not me.

    RIP

  • February 2, 2014 3:36 pm

    "I don’t know why everyone thinks the high part and the low part of the brow are the only good parts," he says. "When did the middle get to be the bad brow? It’s like, ‘Oh, that’s so bourgeois!’ Let me put this in perspective: we don’t really like miserable poverty, and we don’t really like gigantic, asshole-ish 1% creephood. I think we’re actually for the middle class. So make sure the middle class actually has some interesting stuff to think about."

    James Schamus on the disappearance of quality middlebrow. A world where there is nothing in between Transformers and Upstream Color gets closer every day.

  • February 2, 2014 3:00 am

    Stanley Kubrick negotiates crew tea break schedule on Full Metal Jacket.

    If you grew you during the period when Kubrick was unseen, uninterviewed and unphotographed and everyone just assumed he was Jack Torrance - an insane anti-social mad genius raging in some attic, all these glimpses remain astonishing.

  • February 1, 2014 3:12 pm
    HAS THE SUN SET ON THE CINEMA? Shocking field study results
Some interesting and disturbing results from my journalistic investigations.  In my work at Yahoo Entertainment, we have for a couple months  been hitting actors with our POPsessions questionnaire about their pop cultural backgrounds. 
One of the questions is: What is the first movie you ever saw?
For people of my generation (X), that’s not a question that you even have to think about. It’s like asking people what date their birthday is on. Growing up watching the same episodes of “Family Affair” over and over on fuzzy rabbit ears reception, suddenly being taken into a dark palace where a huge image soaring above plays out an epic story with production pieces beyond your wildest fantasies was one of the formative experiences of our lives.  Mine was Willie Wonka, and you can only imagine after 4 years of F Troop what that was suddenly like. To say my life was changed in a day would not be understating.  And so it was for most people I know.
So what has shocked me while conducting this survey, is that when I’ve talked to actors  - and mind you, these are people who make their careers on the screen - in their 20’s or below and ask them this question, nearly to a person they can’t remember.  Or they don’t understand the question and they think I’m asking: what was the first movie you watched on TV.  Their answers in this questionnaire, nearly always end up being that: the first film they remember watching on repeat on DVD. But almost none of them had a clear memory of going to the movie theater for the first time.  And this includes from very intelligent, incredibly creative young people I’ve spoken to.
This is of course disturbing for a thousand reasons. But most of all, I remember my time working at a newspaper way back in the mid 00’s when circulation was just taking the first stomach churning lurches as the jets began to fall from the sky. I remember how everyone had their thoughts about how the paper  - and all papers - were messing up, and everyone had their answers for how to lure people back. But at the bottom of it, every consideration came back to the fact that at that point two or three generations had come of age without adopting the newspaper habit as part of their daily lives, and having matured without it, it was going to be impossible to convince them it was necessary.
Whether these generations losing the newspaper habit was the fault of the newspapers themselves, just a reflection of the changing ways people consumed information or the growing post-literacy of our times is an interesting topic for debate (I vote for a combination of all three), but the fact remained that once that ship had sailed, newspapers doom was pre-ordained.
So: I put it to you America. Do are dozen or so actors I’ve talked to indicative of a larger trend?  And if moviegoing has lost its special place in the imagination, can it survive?  Or is that specialness something that people are able to come by later?  I have no opinion on “box office slump” reporting, other than generally to support my friend David Poland’s assertions that the articles on this are wildly simplistic and over-hyping a trend.  But stil!  I worry!  View high resolution

    HAS THE SUN SET ON THE CINEMA? Shocking field study results

    Some interesting and disturbing results from my journalistic investigations.  In my work at Yahoo Entertainment, we have for a couple months  been hitting actors with our POPsessions questionnaire about their pop cultural backgrounds. 

    One of the questions is: What is the first movie you ever saw?

    For people of my generation (X), that’s not a question that you even have to think about. It’s like asking people what date their birthday is on. Growing up watching the same episodes of “Family Affair” over and over on fuzzy rabbit ears reception, suddenly being taken into a dark palace where a huge image soaring above plays out an epic story with production pieces beyond your wildest fantasies was one of the formative experiences of our lives.  Mine was Willie Wonka, and you can only imagine after 4 years of F Troop what that was suddenly like. To say my life was changed in a day would not be understating.  And so it was for most people I know.

    So what has shocked me while conducting this survey, is that when I’ve talked to actors  - and mind you, these are people who make their careers on the screen - in their 20’s or below and ask them this question, nearly to a person they can’t remember.  Or they don’t understand the question and they think I’m asking: what was the first movie you watched on TV.  Their answers in this questionnaire, nearly always end up being that: the first film they remember watching on repeat on DVD. But almost none of them had a clear memory of going to the movie theater for the first time.  And this includes from very intelligent, incredibly creative young people I’ve spoken to.

    This is of course disturbing for a thousand reasons. But most of all, I remember my time working at a newspaper way back in the mid 00’s when circulation was just taking the first stomach churning lurches as the jets began to fall from the sky. I remember how everyone had their thoughts about how the paper  - and all papers - were messing up, and everyone had their answers for how to lure people back. But at the bottom of it, every consideration came back to the fact that at that point two or three generations had come of age without adopting the newspaper habit as part of their daily lives, and having matured without it, it was going to be impossible to convince them it was necessary.

    Whether these generations losing the newspaper habit was the fault of the newspapers themselves, just a reflection of the changing ways people consumed information or the growing post-literacy of our times is an interesting topic for debate (I vote for a combination of all three), but the fact remained that once that ship had sailed, newspapers doom was pre-ordained.

    So: I put it to you America. Do are dozen or so actors I’ve talked to indicative of a larger trend?  And if moviegoing has lost its special place in the imagination, can it survive?  Or is that specialness something that people are able to come by later?  I have no opinion on “box office slump” reporting, other than generally to support my friend David Poland’s assertions that the articles on this are wildly simplistic and over-hyping a trend.  But stil!  I worry! 

  • January 26, 2014 9:06 pm
    No one wore any of these at the Grammys tonight.  Pathetic fashion fail. View high resolution

    No one wore any of these at the Grammys tonight.  Pathetic fashion fail.