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Rushfield Babylon

where it all went wrong
Writer, reporter, Idol chronicler, seer. Contact: rr at richardrushfield dot com

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  • March 5, 2013 3:34 pm
    How Hollywood Copes with Disaster
From BuzzFeed:

Sooner or later, into the life of every entertainment executive some flops must fall. But coping with failure in a productive, healthy way is not an automatic instinct in a town where schadenfreude and finger-pointing are more popular than the Super Bowl — for every show-business executive must eventually face the day when he or she has to take the long walk down the studio corridor after their weekend disaster.

As one Executive tells it:

If there’s a crime and the community is outraged, the police feel incredible pressure to produce a culprit. And if some shady looking kid had been seen hanging around the park where a murder happened, no one is going to be looking too hard at the case when the cops turn him over. For any movie to do well or not, a whole bunch of variables have to work: you have to luck out with your release date – you don’t want to come out right after
 Harry Potter. Are you marketing to right audience, spending enough? Spending in the right places?
There are so many different elements, but that’s at odds with everybody’s desire to have a quick pithy reason why something didn’t work. It’s in everyone’s interest for the finger to be pointed at one culprit. After John Carter flopped, all the daggers at Disney pointed at all the daggers pointed at (marketing executive) MT Carney, who was new to the studio and didn’t have a lot of friends there, as if the decision to change the film’s name was a 90 million dollar error. Once a person is stuck holding the bag, you can feel the room backing away.
 


Read it all at BuzzFeed. View high resolution

    How Hollywood Copes with Disaster


    From BuzzFeed:

    Sooner or later, into the life of every entertainment executive some flops must fall. But coping with failure in a productive, healthy way is not an automatic instinct in a town where schadenfreude and finger-pointing are more popular than the Super Bowl — for every show-business executive must eventually face the day when he or she has to take the long walk down the studio corridor after their weekend disaster.

    As one Executive tells it:

    If there’s a crime and the community is outraged, the police feel incredible pressure to produce a culprit. And if some shady looking kid had been seen hanging around the park where a murder happened, no one is going to be looking too hard at the case when the cops turn him over. For any movie to do well or not, a whole bunch of variables have to work: you have to luck out with your release date – you don’t want to come out right after

     Harry Potter. Are you marketing to right audience, spending enough? Spending in the right places?

    There are so many different elements, but that’s at odds with everybody’s desire to have a quick pithy reason why something didn’t work. It’s in everyone’s interest for the finger to be pointed at one culprit. After John Carter flopped, all the daggers at Disney pointed at all the daggers pointed at (marketing executive) MT Carney, who was new to the studio and didn’t have a lot of friends there, as if the decision to change the film’s name was a 90 million dollar error. Once a person is stuck holding the bag, you can feel the room backing away.

     

    Read it all at BuzzFeed.

    1. richardrushfield posted this